CRYO CHAMBER

We are always curious about how the artists realize their music, what they think about it or – more in general – how they see the world around us, and why they decide to express it. The point is, they are not the only that do this job. We always forget about the  people that, with their passion, search the best music projects around, they support them and they share it in the best way they can, often without receive anything back. These people work as booking agents but also as owner of distribution channels or labels.

Let’s start then with a series of interviews of some of these people, to see which is their point of view and why they put efforts and space on their channel for music they believe should be share with the rest of the world. First one on the list is Cryo Chamber, a label found by Simon Heath, mind of the dark ambient project Atrium Carceri.

cryochamber1920-WP-copy.jpg

Let’s start from the beginning. It was 2011 and the label of your solo project, Atrium Carceri, was not able to support you anymore and you had the idea of Cryo Chamber. Creating something like this requires some efforts, so I would like to ask if you searched an alternative label before, or did you just feel the urgency to have a label that reflected exactly the purpose of your music?

I was a bit tired of the shock value focus that was so common in my scene, so I searched for a creative space with like minded artists where we could focus on the atmospheric instead. The answer was to start it myself, a label where artists could work together by helping each other with creative and technological hurdles and to interweave parts of our mythoses between projects.

You describe your label as Cinematic Dark Ambient. Can you explain what means to you this definition, and which role you believe has this type of music in the industry? Which meaning, or message, has for its public?

It’s based on an idea of soundtracks to unwritten movies. The concept and narrative has center stage in this music, unlike other genres we aren’t expressing ourselves so much as creating soundscapes that are meant to move the listeners by it’s immersive quality and atmospheric focus alone. We plan in advance a lot on how to structure scenes and write the narrative for the scenes within the music so we end up more as directors than actors, or composers more than instrumentalists. Questions that arise in the studio makes this separation obvious. What do the sounds represent in the sonic space? What is a passage telling us about the environment? What is the narrative within a scene?

“We believe it to be the future of not only our scene, but the music industry as a Whole”. In particular, which kind of dynamics do you see in the music industry for the future, especially for the underground one?

I think that depends a lot on how the economy of the internet moves forward and if we lose net neutrality. Big media networks will always strive for a monopoly, the music industry is no different.

We are in the digitization Era and Internet heavily modified our music fruition. Does it make any sense to put energy in an old-fashioned institution as a label, especially when profit are limited?

For most creative work profits as a bonus instead of as a primary goal tends to work out better in the long run.

The music of your label is quite epic and ritualistic, and influences from soundtracks are easily found. What do you really like about this sound?  Do you think that in the future can be abandoned by your label in favor of other proposals/genres , or it will be simple integrated in a bigger picture?

Most of us artists on the label are huge movie buffs and avid OST collectors and listeners, so influences from soundtracks are definitely big. Personally I like the idea of building other worlds brick by brick, I’ve been doing it all my life. Scribbling in notebooks, building mythoses, writing down lucid dreams or psychedelic trip reports. The label sound has kept growing towards the fringes for awhile so stay tuned to see what’s around the next corner.